Reading List



[last updated: May 2022]
︎Bijker, W. E. (1995). Of bicycles, bakelites, and bulbs: Toward a theory of sociotechnical change. MIT Press.

︎Branch Magazine: A sustainable Internet for all (2021). https://branch.climateaction.tech/

︎Buchan, S. (2021). On the Back Burner: How Facebook’s Inaction on Misinformation Fuels the Global Climate Crisis. Stop Funding Heat. https://stopfundingheat.info/wp-content/uploads/2021/05/On-The-Back-Burner-Final.pdf

︎Cohn, C. (1987). Sex and death in the rational world of defense intellectuals. Signs, 12(4), 687–718.

︎Collee, L. (2021). The Great Offline. Reallifemage. https://reallifemag.com/the-great-offline/

︎Crary, J. (2014). 24/7: Late capitalism and the ends of sleep. Verso.

︎D’Ignazio, C., & Klein, L. F. (2020). Data feminism. MIT Press.

︎Elish, M. C. (2016). Moral crumple zones: Cautionary tales in human-robot interaction. SSRN Electronic Journal, (WeRobot 2016), n.p. doi: 10.2139/ssrn.2757236

︎Gillespie, T. (2010). The politics of ‘platforms’. New Media & Society, 12(3), 347–364. https://doi.org/10.1177/1461444809342738

︎Medina, E. (2011). Cybernetic revolutionaries: Technology and politics in Allende’s Chile. MIT Press.

︎Turner, F. (2006). From counterculture to cyberculture: Stewart Brand, the Whole Earth network, and the rise of digital utopianism. University of Chicago Press.

︎Wajcman, J. (1991). Feminism confronts technology.

︎Wiener, A. (2020). Uncanny Valley. MCD Books. 

︎Winner, L. (1980). Do artifacts have politics? Daedalus, 109(1), 121–136.